Category:Italy

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Flag of Italy Italy
Location of Italy
Ski Season Dec - March, some year round
Ski Areas Alagna Valsesia

Alpe Ciamporino
Champoluc
Cimone
Dolomiti Superski
Sulden-Solda
Courmayeur
Bormio
Cortina d'Ampezzo
Livigno
Malcesine
Macugnaga
Schnalstal
Via Lattea
Sella Nevea

Capital Rome
41°54′N 12°29′E
Largest city Rome
Official language(s) Italian
Area 301,318 km²
Population  
 - 2006 est. 58,751,711 (22nd)
 - Density 192.8/km² (54th)
499.4/sq mi 
Currency Euro (€)2
(EURConvert
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
Calling code +39
Overview 

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Climate

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Snow Areas

There are plenty of excellent ski resorts in the Italian Alps - particularly in the Dolomites, which have the most dramatic scenery. The major resorts are Cortina d'Ampezzo in the Veneto; Madonna di Campiglio, San Martino di Castrozza and Canazei in Trentino; Bormio in Alta Valtellina in Lombardia and Courmayeur in the Valle d'Aosta, however there are a multitude of others. The ski season generally extends from December to Mid April, though there is year-round skiing on Mont Blanc, the Matterhorn and Valle d'Aosta and summer ski at Stelvio Pass.

Getting There

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Visas and Documentation

Australians can enter Italy as a tourist and stay up to 90 days without a visa.

Airports

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Customs and Quarantine

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Cultural Info

Languages: Italian, German, French, Slovene

Major Religions: 85% Roman Catholic, 5% Jewish and Protestant

National Holidays

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Transport

Air travel within Italy is expensive, making it a less-attractive option than travel by train or bus. Buses are fast and reliable, whether they are traversing local routes linking small villages or zooming along autostrade between cities. They come into their own to reach destinations not serviced by the trains. State and private railways service the country, and are generally simple, cheap and efficient. Roads are generally good throughout the country, and there is an excellent network of freeways, although you do have to pay tolls.

Food and Drink

Prices in Italian bars and cafés double (sometimes even triple) if you sit down.

Technology and Networks

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Taxes

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Credit Cards

Credit cards are widely accepted in Italy. Visa is the easiest card with which to obtain cash advances from banks.

Tipping

You are not expected to tip at restaurants, it is common practice, however, to leave a small amount. In bars, locals will often leave any small change as a tip, but this is by no means obligatory. Tipping taxi drivers is not common practice, but your hotel porter will expect a little something.

Health and Safety

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Emergency Numbers

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Medical Centers

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Natural Disasters

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Crime

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Resources

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